Japanese Traditional Game

The Unique Side of Japan

Being able to live in Japan for 2 weeks was like a dream come true to me. Well, not really a dream actually since I’ve never dreaming about going to Japan. It’s more like an… unexpected gift. I’ve never imagined myself to go to Japan since it’s known for the high prices. You know, the high living cost, the high food price, and the lists go on and on.

But then, I was lucky enough to be one of the participants of AIMS Short Stay Program 2014 in TUAT (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology / Nokodai) Japan. Domo arigato gozaimasu for the chance!

Anyway, I did observe things during my stay. I watched how people interact with each other, how they behave, how they do things. I learned so many things from them. We also have a short discussion about it at class πŸ˜‰

Here’s some of the things I found during my stay.

Slippers, Slippers, and Slippers

Genkan
The Genkan

It is a custom in JapanΒ to remove our shoes just right after entering a house. The area for removing our shoes is called GenkanΒ (ηŽ„ι–’). Well, it’s normally lower than the main part of the house. And it’s somehow ‘dirtier’ than the higher part of the house.

After removing your shoes at the genkan, you have to use the slipper.Β And… when you enter the bathroom, you’ve got to remove your slipper and change it with another slipper called the bathroom slippers.

Too much for a slipper rules, huh? And I also found that the slipper is somehow… slippery. Not sure if my friends feel the same.

Sentō

Sentō (銭湯) is a communal bathroom in Japan. Too bad I didn’t take a picture of it! But here’s the thing. Sentō usually consists of 2 main parts : Changing Room and Bathroom. And of course a genkan, if that counts.

The bathroom itself has a bathtub and many showers, buckets, and tiny stools.

You have to enter the bathroom naked, together with the other people. It feels awkward at the first time. But as soon as you dip yourself at the hot water, you’ll forget about it.

First thing you wanna do is to clean yourself at the shower, or you can use the buckets if you prefer the Japanese traditional way. I clean myself twice before dipping myself at the bathtub since I heard that the water will be used again later by others. (Sounds yucks, but yes it’s true).

Interesting, huh?

Standing Party

When we, exchange students, arrived at the university, the people there hold a welcome party for us. It’s so different with any other party I usually found in Indonesia!

There are tables with some drinks and snacks in the middle of it. Then, people will gather round the table, take some drink, and do the kanpai!Β Β – a toast.

Japanese Party
The Snacks
Kanpai
Kanpai!

And after that, you can start eating the snack and chat with the other participant. Sometimes, they hold a Japanese traditional games as well. This one is called Fukuwarai. We have to pin the eyes, nose, mouth, and eyebrows on the face with our eyes closed. Pretty similar with Pin The Tail on The Donkey game, I guess.

Japanese Traditional Game
Fukuwarai

No Crossing Leg!

You know women who tends to cross her leg while sitting? Of course, most of us do that here in Indonesia. Surprisingly, crossing leg is found to be a bit rude in Japan. So, I was in the class, sitting calmly with my leg crossed (didn’t even noticed that before as it’s quite natural for me), and then ourΒ senseiΒ mentioned about how impolite it is to cross our leg during lecture.

Surprise, surprise! So that’s why you can’t find many people crossing their leg at the public transportation. I tried hard not to then.

Punctuality

Punctual
Be Punctual!

Punctuality is something Japanese is proud about. It’s their value. You have to arrive 5 minutes before the appointment time. Guess what? It doesn’t only apply to a serious appointment, but you also have to be punctual when attending a party.

Well, it’s totally different with the people in my country. People here tend to arrive 30 minutes late, even for a formal appointment. Well, not all people. But most of them do so.

Festivals (Matsuri)

There are countless matsuri (η₯­) held inΒ Japan. There are Girl’s Festival, Boy’s Festival, New year festival, Sport Festival, 7-5-3 festival, and the lists go on and on.

This one is Hina-Matsuri (Girl’s Festival). It was held at the second day of me staying in Japan. Girls usually eatΒ Chirashizushi and some kind of special soup in this very special day, and also a cake.

People usually start to display the dolls in February, and take them down after the festival.Β This one is the one I found at the cafeteria. It’s quite small actually. It usually consists of 7 layer with sooo many dolls.

Hinamatsuri
Hinamatsuri

And then there’s Hanami (literally, Flower Watching). I don’t know if it’s a festival or not, but people usually gathered along at a park, eating some snacks while watching the flower. The flower itself could be cherry blossom or plum blossom, the two most favorite flowers in Japan.

We found this flower at Yoyogi Park. Read our story!

Sakura at Yoyogi Park
Hanami at Yoyogi Park

Sushi Go Round

And of course, some sushi. The sushi restaurant we found on our last night in Japan was totally different with the one in Indonesia. (Thanks to Nano for the recommendation!)

Each table has their own, let’s say, a tab where we can order our foods. Then, the chef will prepared our sushi and put it at the sushi bar. The surprising thing is, the bell will ring when our sushi is approaching!

Sushi Go Round
The screen for ordering

Sushi

Each plate has its own sensor, so that’s why…

Sushi
Look what’s under the plate!

Ah, so desu ka!

If you come over to Japan, you’ll hear people saying “Ah, so desu ka!” or “Ah, so ka!” most of the time. It’s like saying : “Oh really?” or “Oh, I see!”

The communication in Japanese should be in 2 directions. If one people is talking, the other should give a feedback, and it goes on. Even if you’re not interested at the subject, you should always give a feedback – to respect others πŸ™‚

Kawaii Things

Japanese are obsessed with kawaii things. I found this bus during my walk to our house.

Kawaii Bus
Kawaii Pikachu Bus

This kawaii – thing also applies to packaging. There are so many chocolate and snacks wrapped inΒ kawaii packaging.

Kawaii Chocolate
Kawaii Chocolate Packaging

And here comes the best thing… KAWAII GIRL!

Kawaii Girl
Kawaii Girl

No, the last one’s a joke. Kawaii girl don’t wear braces, no? Please don’t judge me.

***

That’s a lot of things, right? Well. Japanese might found this as a common thing, but for me, those are things I couldn’t find in my country. You might also wanna know that almost everything Japanese does has its own reason. And that’s a good thing for sure.

Until next time, Nippon! There are a lot of things I haven’t discovered yet ^^

***
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email :Β lohh.sharon@gmail.com

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26 pemikiran pada “The Unique Side of Japan

    1. Hihihihi coklat nya lucu ya!!!
      Aku nya candaan doang sih πŸ˜› But thanks! Haha.

      Iya unik2 banget. Masih banyak lagi tuh pasti yang aneh2 yang belum aku temuin πŸ˜€ Festival nya aja ada banyak banget.

  1. Sharon…so true! You’ve listed all the reasons I love Japan! And, when I lived there, we would take our slippers with us to someone’s house so we didn’t have to wear the ones that all guests wear.

  2. Kamu bukan maniak komik atau anime gitu ya. Meski begitu, ternyata kamu tetep bisa menikmati trip kamu di sana dan mendalami budaya lokal. Kalau gue sih emang udah dari kecil gandrung sama Jpop (komik, anime, musik), makanya gue obsessed bgt pengen ke Jepang.

    Btw, slipper itu namanya Uwabaki kalau nggak salah πŸ˜‰

    1. Hahahaha iya komik yang aku baca dulu cuma Shinchan dan Doraemon tok πŸ˜›

      Oh iya? Wih nambah vocab baru. Makasih info nya! πŸ˜€
      Semoga kesampean ke Jepang ya biar bisa explore anime2 nya πŸ˜›

  3. How cool you got to see the cherry blossoms! I’m super jealous as my plans to spend the winter in Japan fell through. Did you get to travel to the Nagano Prefecture? My dream is to be a part of one of their epic winters, hopefully sometime soon!

    1. I’m not sure if it’s cherry blossoms or plum blossoms, Dave πŸ˜‰
      Nope! I was really hoping that I could try ski or something. You know, there’s no snow in Indonesia. But no luck. Hopefully I’m coming back soon!

  4. Wow I didn’t know crossing your legs is considered rude in Japan! Mungkin kl di Indonesia sama kaya cewe duduk ngangkang kali ya, orang2 suka bilang ga baik. Love this post!

    1. I knoooow right! Iya mungkin sama kyk kita ngangkang ya hihihi. Ekstrim sih tapi kalo nyilang kaki rude. Tapii mungkin kalo jaman skrg yg udah “gaul” gitu ga se-strict itu lagi πŸ™‚

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